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The Osprey Man Of The Flathead: Doug MacCarter
Montana Senior News June/July 2017
Undoubtedly, childhood events shape lives and Doug MacCarter’s career as a wildlife biologist testifies to that. During his teen years living in southeastern Montana, Doug's capture of a four-legged bull snake – not a normal snake – indirectly influenced his future when the Billings Gazette ran an illustrated story about it. This drew the attention of a local wildlife biologist who happened to be a falconer.
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Steve Eckels Is Like Fred Astaire With A Guitar
Montana Senior News June/July 2017
If you had to choose a quality to describe guitarist Steve Eckels, patient would certainly fit. So would gifted and inventive. However, anyone trying to pigeon-hole Steve with a handful of adjectives would have almost as much difficulty as a tenor trying to sing bass.
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Aiming For Zero Waste: Home ReSource And The City Of Missoula
Montana Senior News April/May 2017
Back when many readers of this newspaper were growing up, the “3 R’s” referred to the educational basics of reading, writing, and arithmetic. Nowadays, that term has also come to mean something else— reduce, reuse, and recycle, in that order, as ways to downsize waste.
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Ten Tips For Taking Better Photos
Montana Senior News April/May 2017
“You can look at a picture for a week and never think of it again. You can also look at a picture for a second and think of it all your life.” Although the words belong to Joan Miró, best known for his paintings and sculptures, the truth behind them applies equally well to photography.
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Nourishing The Soul Along With The Body: YWCA Missoula's Cooking Angels
Montana Senior News Feb./March. 2017
If you tend to think of the YWCA mainly in terms of a place to stay physically fit, you might be surprised to learn that not all YWCA’s exist for that purpose. With a mission statement that includes, “eliminating racism, empowering women, and promoting peace, justice, freedom and dignity for all,” YWCA Missoula has followed a different road, “the one less traveled” (to quote Robert Frost) for over a century. And that, “has made all the difference” to scores of women, children, and men with nowhere to turn when faced with domestic or sexual violence or discrimination.
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Making Community Connections Through Cooking: Missoula’s Harriet Eichenholz
Montana Senior News Feb./March. 2017
Early in her catering career, Harriet Eichenholz made a memorable mistake involving—of all things—deviled eggs. Those eggs taught her a business lesson that continues to guide her over 20 years later.
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Finding Beauty In A Broken World: Silversmith Nancy Bugbee
Montana Senior News Feb./March. 2017
Discipline and play might seem like contradictory mindsets to create art but not for silversmith Nancy Bugbee. For over three decades, Nancy has relied on both discipline and a sense of playfulness to produce her whimsically charming jewelry. In fact, among the drills, scales, presses, and pliers residing in her Missoula studio, you can also see quotes reminding her to maintain a balance between those two concepts.
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Bikers Against Bullies Empowers Kids
Montana Senior News Feb./March. 2017
Without doubt, Aretha Franklin brought the word “R-E-S-P-E-C-T” to the world’s attention with her 1960s hit song. Half a century later in Missoula, you can find other unlikely champions of this time-honored ideal – tattooed, leather-garbed Harley bikers. However, their message of respect is conveyed, not on dance floors, but at schools combating bullying.
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Hiking’s Tiny Dynamic Duo or Much Ado About Magnets
Montana Senior News Oct./Nov. 2016
Never let it be said that the little things in life can’t make a hiker happy. Proof of that humbly resides on my backpack’s sternum strap which buckles across my chest. Measuring a mere 1/2-inch in diameter and weighing all of 4 grams, the object of my affection is none other than an old-fashioned magnet. When employed as a means for taming a wayward drink tube dangling from said backpack, its status shifts from inconsequential to indispensable faster than it takes to swallow a mouthful of water.
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British Invasion Rock Music Quiz
Montana Senior News, Idaho Senior Independent Aug./Sept. 2016
The year 1963 marked a memorable era in pop music history known as The British Invasion. That year American disc jockeys played their first Beatles’ recordings and teens from coast to coast could not hear enough of it. The incredible response nationwide to their Mersey Sound opened the way for the Fab Four’s televised performance on the Ed Sullivan Show in February the following year and America’s music scene has never been the same. The invasion may have started with the Beatles but it by no means ended there.
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So Many Women, So Little Time: Mary Jane Bradbury Brings History to Life
Montana Senior News Aug./Sept. 2016
Aside from qualifying as three of the best-known women from Montana’s past, Nancy Russell, Evelyn Cameron, and Jeanette Rankin have something else in common. Each of their stories has been brought to life by Mary Jane Bradbury, who provides some of the most entertaining history lessons any audience could ever hope to receive.
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It's Magic!!! Magician uses fun illusions to teach safety
Rural Montana
Even in 21st-century America electricity can still seem magical. Flip a switch and lights blaze. Turn a knob and gingersnaps bake. Press a button and Beethoven’s 9th fills the air. Powerful and invisible, electricity can be one of our best friends or deadliest foes—if treated improperly. No one knows this better than Columbia Falls magician Dan Jimmerson, who teaches Montana 4th and 5th graders how to safeguard against electrical accidents and possible electrocution.
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Sue Cummings Has Taken A Cheesemaker’s Journey
Montana Senior News, June/July 2016
Like many of today’s grandparents, Sue Cummings has a Facebook page and grandchildren she adores. But unlike many of those same grandparents, she does not post photos of her progeny on Facebook. Instead, you will find pictures of something else that gives Sue almost as much joy as those five little Cummings—her homemade cheese.
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The Best-Ever Four-Legged Fertilizing Lawnmowers: Steitzhof’s Merino Sheep
Montana Senior News, June/July 2016
Carol Treadwell-Steitz may not be a Trekkie, but she is definitely acquainted with one of Star Trek’s most famous lines: “to boldly go where no man has gone before.” In Carol’s case, it is her fingers that have boldly gone places she never dreamt of before she became a midwife to a small herd of South Australian Merino sheep.
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Putting All The Colors In Their Places: Potter Joanna Griffin
Montana Senior News, June/July 2016
If you were a sleuth seeking clues as to an artist’s identity, a thoughtful study of that person’s work could reveal some intriguing facts. Take Joanna Griffin’s pottery for instance. Some of her pieces are inscribed with quotes from the Scriptures while others bear charming images of African women and children. And yet others create visions of vivid rainbows, pastel-hued skies, or star-sprinkled nights. Together, these telling details effectively fingerprint the woman behind the colorful artware created in Pomegranate Clay Studio.
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Bringing Out The Kid In Everybody: Magical Entertainer Dan Jimmerson
Montana Senior News, June/July 2016
“What the eyes see and the ears hear, the mind believes.” The words may be Harry Houdini’s but the truth behind them has guided illusionists long before and after Houdini’s heyday. No one knows this better than magical entertainer Dan Jimmerson. He mastered his first card trick when he was 11 and is still keeping audiences smiling and baffled.
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Rock n' Roll...What Music!
Montana Senior News, Idaho Senior Independent June/July 2016
Nothing brings back memories like music. Take this quiz and enjoy a trip back to the fabulous 50’s and early 60’s.
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You Can Sell Your House With These Brownies
Montana Senior News, Idaho Senior Independent June/July 2016
I once overheard a woman say she thought everyone ought to make brownies from scratch instead of from a mix. She had just baked her first batch of brownies relying on a recipe and happily reported the superiority of the one-saucepan method. I was surprised, but not because I was unaware that homemade brownies were one of the easiest and tastiest treats on the planet to prepare. It just seemed amazing to me that it had taken another baby boomer so long to make this discovery.
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Ageless Love: Speed Dating In Missoula
Montana Senior News, Feb. 2016/March 2016
Last fall, eight women and eight men from age 64 to 87 gathered at The Silk Road in Missoula to embark on a romantic adventure none of them could have dreamed of four decades ago. Mostly strangers to one another, all were single; all were open-minded; all were willing to give speed dating a try.
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Jim Sheldon Brings To Life An Ice-Age Story
Montana Senior News, Feb. 2016/March 2016
If you think “The Erratics” sounds like the name for a rock group, you would be right—but probably for the wrong reason. The members of this non-musical band happen to feel more passionately about geology than The Rolling Stones.
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Putting Mettle To The Pedal: Cyclist Karel Stroethoff
Montana Senior News, Feb. 2016/March 2016
Should you ever notice a bicycler asleep by the roadside, just imagine a “Do Not Disturb” sign posted and keep driving. Though your initial impulse may be to stop and check on the person, chances are any cyclist sprawled on the grass or stretched out on a picnic table is not ailing but could be a tired Randonneaur. And while your intentions would be noble, the catnapping cyclist would prefer you not act on them, thank you very much.
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Out To Lunch In Caras Park: Making Missoula Vibrant
Montana Senior News, Feb. 2016/March 2016
If you ever yearn for a peaceful al fresco lunch spot in Missoula and it happens to be a Wednesday between June and August—forget about Caras Park. If, however, you can forsake quietude for the company of a thousand other music-loving folks and the best outdoor smorgasbord in town, by all means join the party.
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Rolling Thunder: Missoula's Mini-Sturgis Rally
Montana Senior News, Feb. 2016/March 2016
The roar of the Harleys—the smell of the burgers. Ah, yes. If it is a Saturday in July and you happen to be near Old Fort Missoula, it can mean only one thing—the Garden City’s own Mini-Sturgis rally. That translates to about 40 motorcycles, 550 potential bike passengers, plus a whole lotta hamburgers, hot dogs, and Polish sausage.
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Laura Heine: Painter In Fabric
Montana Senior News, Feb. 2016/March 2016
Is the age-old craft of quilting dwindling or attracting a new generation of enthusiasts? Since quilting remains part of the state’s cultural heritage, Montanans might assume it is almost as widespread now as when people had to sew their own blankets to keep warm.
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A Man For The Outdoors: Jack Ballard
Montana Senior News, Dec.2015/Jan. 2016
It is no coincidence that Jack Ballard is one of the most widely published outdoor writers and photographers in America today. Chance had nothing to do with his success. But two facets from his Montana past did—a zeal for reading and growing up on an expansive farm-ranch near Three Forks.
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The Accidental Restaurateur: Joanie Swords
Montana Senior News, Dec.2015/Jan. 2016
Unlike contestants on televised food competitions such as Chopped and Top Chef, Joanie Swords has never aspired to culinary glory. Back in 2010 when she opened Harper & Madison (H & M) Joanie dreamt only of opening a neighborhood shop featuring hand-crafted scones, muffins, cakes and other treats from her oven. The last thing she expected was for H & M to become one of the Magic City’s most beloved eateries as well as a destination for summer visitors looking for creative local fare.
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The Man Behind The Message: Eugene Peterson
Montana Senior News August/September 2015
Erudite yet earthy. Impulsive yet intentional. Multi-talented yet modest. These adjectives might appear mismatched but they all accurately portray Eugene Peterson, author of The Message: The Bible in Contemporary Language. For those not among the 11 million people who own a copy of Eugene’s bestseller or who are unfamiliar with it, The Message is a paraphrase, as well as an idiomatic translation, of the Bible. It also happens to be written by a man from Montana.
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Preserving A Legacy Of Artwork: The Clarke Gallery
Montana Senior News August/September 2015
Blackfeet artist John Clarke may have lost the ability to speak and hear at a young age, yet that never kept him from clearly communicating. Through sign language, both American and Indian, as well as the written word, John effectively shared his thoughts. But it was through the silent medium of art that he excelled at expressing his love for the Plains Indian culture, Glacier National Park, and the wildlife that roamed its forests, meadows, and mountains.
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Bandanas: More Than Just A Hiker’s Handkerchief
Montana Senior News August/September 2015
When I began hiking in the Rockies some 30 years ago, I didn’t own collapsible hiking poles, waterproof rain pants, or a backpack with a water bladder—all standard trail equipment for me these days. Instead, I donned a fanny pack, holstered two water bottles in the side pockets, and toted a plastic poncho. I also deemed wooden walking sticks unnecessary.
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Frank Vitale Gives A Voice To Wild Places
Montana Senior News, June/July 2015
It seems fitting that a man who coaxes iron into custom-sized horseshoes can also help forge an alliance among wilderness adversaries. But that won’t come as a news flash to anyone familiar with Frank Vitale—farrier-muleskinner-hunter and longtime veteran of the public-lands’ wars. He has found the same patience and strength required to wield hammer and tongs and to deal with sometimes-stubborn mules have proven invaluable when collaboratively crafting land-use proposals.
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Civility: It's More Than Manners
Montana Senior News, June/July 2015
As a newlywed, Kalispell’s Diana Damron learned a life-changing lesson about civility from her husband. He arrived (and still arrives) everywhere early or on-time while she was perpetually late. Their different approaches to time management created friction whenever they had to be someplace together at a set time. On one memorable occasion, after Diana once-again finished apologizing, he met her words with silence.
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A Commitment To Community: Sharon Bengtson
Montana Senior News June/July 2015
If you wanted to compare Sharon Bengtson to anyone, George Bailey from Frank Capra’s It's A Beautiful Life would be an ideal candidate. Like George, Sharon is always thinking about the other guy, about her neighbors and how she can be of help.
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Keeping Alive A Neighborhood Tradition: The Buttercup Market And Café
Montana Senior News, February/March 2015
Molly Galusha is indisputably a woman who honors history. Chat with her over a cup of tea at her Buttercup Market and Café, and you will discover for yourself just how dedicated she is to preserving her Montana heritage.
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One For The Bucket List: Tandem Parachuting
Montana Senior News, February/March 2015
When asked by her family how she would like to celebrate her 80th birthday, Barbee Dick offered an answer that caught them all by surprise.
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Music Fills The World Of Mike And Deb Rosbarsky
Montana Senior News, February/March 2015
“All we need is music, sweet music, there’ll be music everywhere.”
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From The Stock Market To Apple Rootstocks: Fred Stewart
Montana Senior News, February/March 2015
If you are looking for a quick return on your investments, Fred Stewart has a helpful piece of advice: Don’t start your own apple orchard. This retired Certified Financial Planner (CFP) knows well of what he speaks—both of apples and money matters.
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A Support Group For Fiber Addicts: Big Sky Fiber Arts Guild
Montana Senior News, February/March 2015
Believe it or not, hand-spinning fibers and cooking gravy have something in common. Aside from their status as age-old household skills, the best results of both activities also happen to be as lump-free as possible. Granted anyone can learn to spin wool or make gravy but to do either well takes practice and patience.
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Leading Tanzanian Wildlife Safaris And Planting Trees: The Perfect Pairing For Doreen Stokes
Montana Senior News, August/Sept. 2014
Migrating wildebeest herds, rhinos, and prides of lions lolling in the savannah sunshine initially lured Doreen Stokes to Africa in 1984. But it was the hospitable impoverished villagers Doreen encountered on her first safari that touched her heart. Meeting them prompted her to return to Africa six more times and eventually partner with Safari Legacy and World Discovery Safaris to lead some of their tours. It also prompted her to embark on a project she was well qualified to helm—reforesting an arid landscape.
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Giving The Gift Of Music: Columbia Falls Community Choir
Montana Senior News, June/July 2014
When Ron Bond started the Columbia Falls Community Choir (CFCC) some three decades ago, he had no idea how far reaching this gift would be. The choir launched with 37 singers and now includes over 100 voices melding in eight-part harmony. People come from as far as Fortine, an hour’s drive away, to participate with Flathead Valley residents in this beloved volunteer coalition. And so far, the trend of more singers wanting to join shows no signs of abating.
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An Artisan For The Ages: Blacksmith Glenn Goldthwait
Montana Senior News, June/July 2014
To many people, a hinge is just a hinge—a necessity, not a piece of art. If they have to buy a hinge to pivot a door, they visit a hardware store and lay down their $15. So, why would anyone pay Glenn Goldthwait ten times that amount for a hinge when the need could be met for far less money? One look at Glenn’s hand-forged hinges with their classic colonial and European-style designs answers the question.
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Glacier Park’s Eyes In The Sky: Alex Hasson
Montana Senior News, June/July 2014
HELP WANTED
Rugged individualist to occupy rustic room with a view. Sharp eyesight, map-reading skills, backcountry savvy required. Must be in top physical condition and able to share isolated location with bears and lightning.
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The Road To Becoming The Lincoln Lawyer
Montana Senior News, June/July 2014
It is probably safe to say that few criminal defense attorneys invite their clients home for Thanksgiving dinner. Grabbing a cup of coffee while conferring—that you might expect. But asking a convicted felon to pass the candied yams to your wife and kids may be a bit much for even the most liberal-minded counselor—unless that counselor happens to be David Ogden, a.k.a., The Lincoln Lawyer.


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Appalachian Dreaming
Montana Senior News, April/May 2014
When Charles “Chuck” Bissonnette decides to embark on an adventure, he thinks in long-distance terms. For Chuck, that means traversing major chunks of the continent on an intimate foot-powered level. In 1978, he bicycled from his Lakeside, Montana home to New England. Then in 2012, he trekked 2,018 miles along the Appalachian Trail (AT) from Georgia to Maine. Chuck had hoped to complete the entire 14-state trail that year but when Mother Nature ceased cooperating his hiking clock ceased ticking.
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